Archive for February, 2013

Exercising, Yin and Yang

February 24, 2013

Think of exercising and stretching and yin and yang.  What one wants to achieve is harmony, like the ancient yin-yang symbol.

 

In yoga, this is expressed as stretch and counter stretch.

The reason your exercise affects singing negatively is because of excessive of one (yin or stretch).  What you need to do is to find the counterbalance– (yang or counter stretch), so that your voice attains harmony.

 

February 24, 2013

http://themodernvocalist.punbb-hosting.com/viewtopic.php?id=6400

 

“Are there certain physical exercises that singers should not do?
One exercise in particular is the pushup. They help me get toned quickly but they affect my breathing. After doing 20 pushups I start doing chest breathing and it becomes very difficult to go back to deep breths. Once my chest and abs get any kind of exercise eg pushup, sit ups it also cuts the endurance of my voice re: shallow breathing.
Have you guys ever had this happen to you? What did you do to remedy it?
I want to audition for a show (kinda like Trinidadian XFactor) and everything matters, looks, voice ect.
Thanks”

 

>>>

A woman fan saw some baseball players in the 60s, walked up to them, and saw they were out of shape. She remarked, you baseball players are overweight. They replied, “but mam, we’re pitchers.” Nowadays, we have muscular pitchers. In the 60s, pitchers were actually discouraged from weight-lifting because it was thought this would shorten their pitch’s “stretch”.

I don’t know golf well, but my recollection is Lee Trevino, a champion, started lifting weights and never regained his “touch”. So, for some time, weight lifting was thought to be detrimental to golf because one’s touch is affected. Modern day golf pro golfers have muscular power.

So, IMO, yes it’s true that exercises can, in the short term, affect singing negatively. But continuous exercising along with stretching and good posture will do wonders for your singing.

 

Extending lows

February 24, 2013

http://themodernvocalist.punbb-hosting.com/viewtopic.php?id=6360

 

“So my question is, how much and how quickly can the low range be extended? And does doing so compromise the high range? It certainly seems like working on the high range has compromised my low range – Eb2 used to be a pretty reliable note for me and now it’s always a stretch…but could it just be cause I’ve neglected the low range?

As far as I know, expanding the low range is mostly a matter of lowering the larynx and maintaining fold closure, any other tricks you’d suggest to increase the low range?”

>>>

IMO, extending lows and highs can be similar and simultaneous. (e.g., think of Tom Jones).

Bass can be increased by extending the vocal tract for greater resonance of low frequncies and reducing amount of sound trapped inside the mouth-throat (enabling more such bass sounds to be released).

Highs volume is increased by sending sounds up through the back of the throat and into the nasal and sinus areas.

Increasing both is by first creating a longer, more spacious vocal tract in uplifting the back of throat (this slightly enlongates the vocal tract, enabling for better low frequency resonance), lowering the larynx (this increases vocal resonance space) and opening the mouth larger (to emit more sounds).   Placing the high notes more in the back of the throat in this shape vocal tract shape enables for more high sounds to get to sinus and nasal areas and resonante more.

So, my opinion is to create a singular vocal tract shape that’s right for both highs and lows and work on developing the full effects of this singular shape.    This is supported by Alan Greene’s book, the New Voice.

throat massage and myofascia

February 24, 2013

 

Anyone know more about these myofascia massage on throat methods?

Single register singing

February 23, 2013

 

10:52 seconds   Johanna Batiste Mancini– notes that there are single register singers.   Is this like Tom Jones?    The question is also why this is rare.  Julie Andrews also?   Appreciate your thoughts.

Movement and Walking

February 4, 2013

Legs, to be stretched continually, needs.   Some leg stretches are helpful, but walking needs to be changed such that it continually stretches.   This can be difficult.

My issues:

Left leg longer–doesn’t have a natural leg motion.   When moving with full leg, then stretches constantly.

Right leg shorter and not oriented properly– knee problem.

 

Shoes.  Shoes restrict foot bend while walking, due to the shoe sole’s tension against foot bending.