Different singing sounds after jogging

From themodernvocalist.com:

[quote=classical guitar]Okay here’s the deal… 

Vocal Range without jogging 3 miles in the morning= A2-A5
Vocal Range with jogging 3 miles in the morning= B3-C#5 (at least)

What’s going on?  It’s so frustrating having to deal with a different instrument half the days of the week…  It’s like bi-polar voice syndrome or something…

Also, I tend to wake up with a realllllly low voice for a tenor in the morning.  Maybe the two are related.  I’m currently on meds for acid reflux, and drinking about a gallon of water a day (have been for a year).  Lot’s of sinus drainage also on days that I don’t get the cardio in…

Anybody else deal with this frustrating crap?[/quote]

Well, here’s my two cents worth.

The body stores muscle tension patterns.  When one runs, one “shakes” up these patterns, and your resonanting mechanism as well as your musclar controls are affected.  Musclar controls return quickly after some rest, but shaking up tension patterns are not restored quickly.  Afterwards, one’s vocal apparatus sounds entirely different.

To solve this, one needs to get rid of the tension patterns–detense–which is a difficult process being described in my blog, www.vocalposture.com.  (Most of the information isn’t on there yet).  By permanently ridding of stored muscular tensions, you’ll sing far better than your current conditions, in any pitch ranges.

Acid reflux meds, especially proton inhibitors, in general, help sufferers sing better.  The reason is that when acid touches the esophageal and mouth tissues, these weaken; furthermore, acidic fumes cause nasal congestion (as the nasal tissues protect themselves by shutting closing the nose to nasal fumes).  With acid reflux med, the vocal tissues are stronger.

Of course, it is better not to use acid reflux med at all; there are lots of techniques for this–some of which is explained or will be explained in www.vocalposture.com.

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